Star Trek and the devalue of money


They had some amazing adventures on the television series, Star Trek.

From battling alien menaces to witnessing supernovas, transforming into weird creatures at the cellular level and inadvertently giving precedent to the Civil Rights Movement by famously being the first television show in history to demonstrate how a man kisses a woman.

I know, I missed out the fact it was a white man kissing a black woman, but from personal experience it’s so good I had to make a point of it with its very own line break.

But the theoretical concept for them gallivanting through time and space like some rock band with their own sociological encyclopaedia of how “straight” to act, struck a phenomenal chord with me every episode due to one change in their broadened society that brings me both hope and a sense of killing myself as I’ll never see it in my own lifetime…

…those bastards don’t use money.

For those who don’t care about such flippant mumbo jumbo, or certainly for the ones that find it easy to be so appealing that money is less of an issue and that boy staring at you from across the room with Bieber-hive hair is your only stressful subject to talk about over Facebook with a dozen or so other self-absorbed social oligarchs, Star Trek is based on a society in the future where the human race phased out money.

Yes, they got no dosh.

Based on the ramblings of one man’s vision of the future, which in contrast is technically a more public contradiction to Tom Cruise’s fun Scientology religion, placing monetary value on goods and services offered by each other for each other “impeded” the natural evolution of the dominant species on the planet, creating so much war, disease and famine that we couldn’t progress. And after a devastating third world war and near self-annihilation, to stave off extinction and pave the way for us to evolve, they did away with monetary economy, banks and finacial institutions. They gave whatever they made for charity and received whatever they asked for.

Supposedly, without money, we’re all nice to each other.

My point though, is that with the freedom from such oppression, I’ve got a feeling that if I didn’t have to worry about money myself, about the future when I’m old and decrepit, sustaining not just myself when I’m a grown boy and taking care of family that need sustenance, I’m pretty sure I’ll enjoy some good adventures.

For now though, as a jobsworth and “workacomic” (amalgamating workaholic and comic like a peanut butter sandwich there, remember me coining this today and realise your eyeballs got pwned), I stare up at the glass ceiling of both success but financial freedom, knowing that I need to grit my teeth and continue on without the feeling of realistic depression bearing down on me.

To view the goal of feeling free to sit at home on my lawn writing notes, reading lovely books and feeling calm before heading to a club to entertain crowds, not as a pipe-dream but as a challenge to overcome.

“Men find single, beautiful women as challenges. Screw that, I find overweight mothers with three kids and a truck-driving husband as challenges. Not to see if they’ll sleep with me, but if I’ll sleep with them.” – Nelson de Gouveia

About the author

Nelson De Gouveia

Nelson has been writing since he can remember, and even won a diploma for public speaking, albeit 20 years ago.
He works full time, loves his girlfriend and plays Batman on his Xbox a lot, even when it's finished.

%d bloggers like this: